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STOL Drag


STOL DRAG

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STOL Drag


STOL DRAG

 

What is STOL Drag?

STOL Drag Creator / Mastermind of Concept Kevin Quinn at the 2013 High Sierra Fly-In

STOL Drag Creator / Mastermind of Concept Kevin Quinn at the 2013 High Sierra Fly-In

 

STOL Drag Racing takes a traditional STOL (Short TakeOff / Landing) competition to the next level. It is extremely spectator friendly and it challenges the pilots like never before.

Pilots fly a 3/4 mile straightaway down and back in a drag racing format side by side. The race brings out the emotions of the pilots and spectators alike creating an exhilarating spectacle to watch. With smoke and/or dust depending on the venue, you have an  eye catching race leaving you with an overwhelming felling of “That was good! Wow!”

Rules:

Pilots fly 3/4 of a mile straight down, land on or after a marked line. They must come to a complete stop prior to turning around. Next they perform (with wheels on the ground) a 180 degree turn and giving it all they have and fly back down the same flight path only to touch down at the starting point (on or after the marked line again). The first pilot that comes to a complete stop wins. Simple. 

SAFETY:

For the safety application of the race, pilots must land and stop on heading at both ends. A flagger is assigned to each lane for the complete stop check. Officials are also at both ends for line judging.

 The fastest airplane (determined in qualifying or preheats) gets lane choice. Given the left turning tenancies of an aircraft, the right lane is preferred. All pilots when turning around at the halfway mark must have the tail of their aircraft turn to the outside and away from the other aircraft. This is also for safety reasons as well. On a paved course planes are flying with smoke canisters. The smoke will inhibit the vision of the right laned pilot if they turn the wrong direction. In the desert or dirt environment, sand and dust will blow into the plane in the right lane also creating an unsafe environment. A DQ will incur for wrong turn direction.

SCORING

Time penalties are awarded to an aircraft for not completing the stop at the halfway point. Landing off heading at any point in the race will incur a DQ.  Time penalties are also incurred if a pilot lands prior to the touch down mark. They are not DQ’d like that of a traditional STOL event however, for every 1- 10’ feet short of the touch down line they land a pilot will receive a 3 second penalty. Land 11- 20 feet short, you get a 6 second penalty and so on. That can add up quickly and give a pilot zero chance of winning with time penalties in place at both ends.

The traditional STOL concept comes to play when pilots are approaching the touch down line. Some pilots will either slip to a landing in order to slow themselves down, others will just pull the throttle back as they get close to the touch down mark. A spot landing is required and a quick stop is paramount.

 A very fast plane with a long over-run can get beat by a slower aircraft Example: Cirrus vs. Cub. The Cub wins by just a second or two because it can stop quickly. It does however fly slow and if the Cirrus can stop faster it wins.

 

STOL Drag Explanation:

STOL Drag Action:

 

Current STOL Drag World Champion Steve Henry in his Wild West Highlander

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Plane vs. Plane


Plane vs. Plane

Plane vs. Plane


Plane vs. Plane

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Live to Ride


Who Is the Fastest?

Live to Ride


Who Is the Fastest?